Archive for Marilyn Lewis

6 Ways to Get Your Official FICO Score Free

By Money Talks News

A high credit score is your ticket to discounts in borrowing and insurance. It can also be a key to landing a job or a rental home.
Why FICO?
FICO (for Fair Isaac Corporation, the company that invented credit scoring) scores are used in an estimated 90 percent of credit decisions in the United States.
FICO is the score that lenders, bankers, landlords, merchants and other businesses check to gauge your creditworthiness.

Not long ago consumers had to pay for a peek at their official FICO scores. But that’s history. Now you can get your score for free if you know where to look.

How to use your score?
For free FICO scores you can thank the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The CFPB pushed the heads of major credit card companies to allow consumers no-cost, regular access to the official FICO score that lenders use, not educational scores likes the ones banks, credit card companies and others often offer consumers instead. The CFPB argued that consumers who can monitor their credit scores are able to improve their credit and avoid delinquency.

Monitoring your score adds to the control you have over your financial life. FICO scores range between 300 and 850; the higher the score, the better your creditworthiness.
Your credit score is meant to predict the risk of lending to you. It is generated when a company like FICO runs data from your creditors through a mathematical formula.
You can see that data, too, in the form of a credit report. It’s smart to keep an eye on those reports, too, since they reveal what merchants and lenders are telling each other about you.

The government requires the three major credit reporting companies – TransUnion, Equifax and Experian, which collect data and produce these reports – to give consumers one free every 12 months. You can get these free credit reports from AnnualCreditReport.com. Monitoring your credit reports lets you keep an eye out for identity theft and reporting errors from creditors.
Learn more about getting credit reports and correcting errors from “How to Get Your Free Credit Report in 6 Easy Steps.”
“7 Fast Ways to Raise Your Credit Score” tells how to boost your numbers.

Watch your score’s movements
Still, credit reports don’t include your credit score. You have to get that separately.
It is instructive and kind of fun to watch your FICO score go up or down as you borrow, repay and apply for credit. Also, an unexpected change might alert you to fraud or an error reported by a credit bureau.

 

How good is the score you see?
Some fluctuation in a score is to be expected. It may move around in response to how you manage your credit, pay your bills and take on new debt.
Despite the decided improvements, a big problem that remains for consumers is the inconsistency among the scores offered, even the FICO scores, writes Washington Post columnist Michelle Singletary:
Even the scores under …read more

Read more here: 6 Ways to Get Your Official FICO Score Free

Category: credit, Fico scores, money, personal finance

6 Painless Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier

By Money Talks News...

Chances are your home mortgage is the largest debt you’ll ever have. How would you like to pay it off and run your mortgage contract through the shredder a lot faster than the 30 years for which most homeowners sign up?

Let’s consider some ways to painlessly pay off your home loan sooner. You can choose to do it a little faster or a lot. In some cases, you’ll scarcely notice the added expense.

1. Make biweekly mortgage payments

Since there are 12 months in a year, homeowners make 12 monthly mortgage payments. But if you make half-sized payments every two weeks (biweekly), you’ll make 26 half-payments, the equivalent of 13 full payments.

Essentially, it is like making 13 monthly payments every year rather than the usual 12.

To go this route, call your lender and ask the best way to do it. Some lenders will set you up with biweekly payments. Or you might simply prefer to send in the extra payments by mail or electronically. Whenever you make any extra payment, however, be sure to designate it “apply to principal.” Otherwise, the lender may treat the extra as a prepayment of your next regular monthly payment.

Use a calculator like this one from the Mortgage Professor to see your savings. For example, according to this calculator, if you have a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage at 3.8 percent, making biweekly payments would save $20,573 in interest over the life of the loan and pay off your mortgage four years earlier. That’s a big bang for not many extra bucks.

One thing to avoid: “mortgage acceleration” products and plans. Paying down your mortgage is an easy thing to do, and you shouldn’t have to pay anything to do it. No expertise or pipeline to a higher authority is required. When you see ads and pitches for mortgage “acceleration” plans, programs and products, run the other direction. (Learn more about these gimmicks here.)

2. Pour every bit of extra cash into your mortgage

Dedicate every windfall – a bonus, raise, or holiday or graduation gift – you receive toward paying down debt. Obviously, the highest-interest debt takes priority. But if you have an adequate emergency savings fund and your mortgage is your only debt, don’t even ask yourself what you’ll do with extra money when it falls into your hands: Add it to your mortgage payment, designating it as additional principal.

It’s possible you’ll find better uses for extra cash than paying down your mortgage. For example, if your mortgage rate is 3.8 percent, but you can earn 5 percent on your money elsewhere, you’re obviously going to be better off earning the 5 percent. Read Stacy’s discussion about the pros and cons of using extra cash to pay down your mortgage.

3. Round up your payments

The monthly payment on a $200,000 mortgage at 3.8 percent fixed over 30 years is about $932 a month. Get into the habit of rounding up that amount …read more

Read more here: 6 Painless Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier

Category: economy, housing market

6 Painless Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier

By Money Talks News

Chances are your home mortgage is the largest debt you’ll ever have. How would you like to pay it off and run your mortgage contract through the shredder a lot faster than the 30 years for which most homeowners sign up?

Let’s consider some ways to painlessly pay off your home loan sooner. You can choose to do it a little faster or a lot. In some cases, you’ll scarcely notice the added expense.

1. Make biweekly mortgage payments

Since there are 12 months in a year, homeowners make 12 monthly mortgage payments. But if you make half-sized payments every two weeks (biweekly), you’ll make 26 half-payments, the equivalent of 13 full payments.

Essentially, it is like making 13 monthly payments every year rather than the usual 12.

To go this route, call your lender and ask the best way to do it. Some lenders will set you up with biweekly payments. Or you might simply prefer to send in the extra payments by mail or electronically. Whenever you make any extra payment, however, be sure to designate it “apply to principal.” Otherwise, the lender may treat the extra as a prepayment of your next regular monthly payment.
Use a calculator like this one from the Mortgage Professor to see your savings. For example, according to this calculator, if you have a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage at 3.8 percent, making biweekly payments would save $20,573 in interest over the life of the loan and pay off your mortgage four years earlier. That’s a big bang for not many extra bucks.

One thing to avoid: “mortgage acceleration” products and plans. Paying down your mortgage is an easy thing to do, and you shouldn’t have to pay anything to do it. No expertise or pipeline to a higher authority is required. When you see ads and pitches for mortgage “acceleration” plans, programs and products, run the other direction. (Learn more about these gimmicks here.)

2. Pour every bit of extra cash into your mortgage

Dedicate every windfall – a bonus, raise, or holiday or graduation gift – you receive toward paying down debt. Obviously, the highest-interest debt takes priority. But if you have an adequate emergency savings fund and your mortgage is your only debt, don’t even ask yourself what you’ll do with extra money when it falls into your hands: Add it to your mortgage payment, designating it as additional principal.
It’s possible you’ll find better uses for extra cash than paying down your mortgage. For example, if your mortgage rate is 3.8 percent, but you can earn 5 percent on your money elsewhere, you’re obviously going to be better off earning the 5 percent. Read Stacy’s discussion about the pros and cons of using extra cash to pay down your mortgage.

3. Round up your payments

The monthly payment on a $200,000 mortgage at 3.8 percent fixed over 30 years is about $932 a month. Get into the habit of rounding up that …read more

Read more here: 6 Painless Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier

Category: economy, money, mortgage, personal finance

Considering a Fixer-Upper? 15 Ways to Avoid a Money Pit

By Money Talks News..

Fixer-uppers are back in style. During the housing boom, few homebuyers wanted to bother with renovation projects. New homes and those in move-in condition were the ideal.

That’s still true for many buyers. But others are finding that, done correctly, remodeling a fixer-upper can save a lot of money. Fixers are getting attention because:

  • Home prices are high in many cities, and a fixer-upper may be the only affordable choice in decent neighborhoods.
  • Home decorating and improvement TV shows inspire many buyers to turn to remodeling to get a home perfectly suited to them.
  • Lovers of period homes always want to restore older structures.

However, the wrong remodeling project can become a money pit that strips your bank account right down to the studs. Here are 15 ways to identify the fixer uppers worth your time and money:

1. Make cool calculations

Bring a cold analytical eye when shopping for a home to renovate. Put your emotions in the back seat while you assess each home’s possibilities.

2. Love the floor plan

Look for a floor plan you can live with. Moving load-bearing walls is an expensive proposition and generally to be avoided. SFGate tells how to identify load-bearing walls.

3. Start with the basement

Inspect a home thoroughly, inside and out. Check inside and outside the basement or foundation for exposed wires and pipes, cracks in the foundation, or water pooling around the home.

“The biggest problems in a house typically arise as a result of poor stability in the structure or foundation,” contractor Tyson Kunz told Bankrate.

Wise Bread says:

[A basement] can provide valuable clues on the quality of construction; condition of the HVAC, plumbing and electrical systems; and how well previous owners have maintained the building. Avoid sagging floor joists or unstable supports, ancient heating and AC systems, leaking water heaters, and electrical panels with loose wires.

HouseLogic and About.com offer more details on inspecting basements.

4. Inspect the roof

Get a home inspector or trusted roofing specialist to tell you if the home needs a new roof, which costs $20,000 to $40,000 and up.

In an article on assessing fixer-uppers, Consumer Reports says:

Runaway water can wreak havoc on any home, and a leaky roof is its quickest way in. If the home has an asphalt roof, look for cracked, curled and missing shingles. Gutters, downspouts and leader pipes should also be in place to collect rainwater and channel it away from the house.

5. Scrutinize bathrooms

Bathrooms deserve special attention because leaks cause rot and structural damage.

“Sloppy showers lead to repeated occurrences of water on the floor that seep through into the floor of the bathroom and adjacent rooms,” says HowToManGuide.com.

6. Avoid ancient plumbing and wiring

The presence of these elderly building materials is a sign of trouble:

  • Galvanized steel pipes: Sediment can build up in the pipes, and they may leak and corrode.
  • Aluminum wiring: It’s a potential fire hazard.

Replacing a home’s plumbing and wiring are …read more

Read more here: Considering a Fixer-Upper? 15 Ways to Avoid a Money Pit

Category: budgeting, buying a house, finance, first house, home improvement, renting an apartment

14 Ways to Get Bigger Checks From Social Security

By Money Talks News...

f you have focused all your retirement planning energy on your 401(k), you may be missing a key piece of the puzzle: Social Security.

You can influence your eventual payout from this safe, dull old-age safety net to a surprising degree by making some adjustments and changes in your planning.

The time to get started pumping up your Social Security checks is now, even if you’ve got decades to go before retirement. Here are some ways to do just that.

From our Solutions Center: Maximize your Social Security benefits

1. Work more years

You must work at least 10 years to collect Social Security. The size of your benefit checks is decided by a formula that is based on your 35 highest-earning years of work. If you didn’t work 35 years, the formula uses zeros for the missing years. Zero years lower your benefits, so add as many more years of work as you can.

SocialSecurity.gov explains the details and shows how benefits are calculated.

2. Avoid claiming too early

The age at which you start collecting Social Security makes a big difference in the size of your checks. (This chart shows how.) You can start as early as age 62, but your checks will be forever 25 percent to 30 percent less than you’re due, depending on when you were born. And if you die first, your spouse’s Social Security survivor benefits will be smaller than if you’d waited.

Some people have no choice. Many retirees stop work earlier than they planned because of illness or unemployment, or to be caregivers. In that case, try to use other sources of income if possible, so you can hold off claiming until you’re older.

3. Aim for full retirement age

Social Security calculates monthly checks based on your “full retirement age.” That’s when you are eligible for 100 percent of your Social Security benefit.

Full retirement age varies: It’s age 66 for people born from 1943 to 1954, increasing gradually to 67 for those born after 1959. To get all the benefits you can, use this Social Security calculator to find your full retirement age and plan your retirement around it.

The longer you wait, the larger your checks and cost-of-living adjustments, which are based on your monthly checks. Waiting to age 70 is even better than collecting at your full retirement age. But more on that later.

4. Raise your income

Doing what you can do now to grow your income will fatten your Social Security checks in the future. Use the Social Security Retirement Estimator to see the effects of more income on your benefits. The estimator taps into your personal work history to give a reasonably accurate estimate of benefits.

Some ways to boost your income:

13 Steps to Hiring a Contractor Who Won’t Rip You Off

By Money Talks News..
With the economy stabilized and home prices rising in much of the U.S. market, homeowners who spent the recession watching home remodeling on TV may now be ready to do some real life work on their homes.

That can mean wading into a world both alien and expensive. The contractor you hire will make all the difference to the success and affordability of your project.

Rip-off artists and incompetents aren’t in the majority, but they are common enough that Spike TV has built a reality show, “Catch a Contractor,” around homeowners’ complaints of botched home construction and remodeling jobs.

So, how do you set up the best outcome for your job? Outside of TV, contractors come in all shapes, sizes and skill levels. Most are professionals who are trying their best to make a living doing work they can be proud of. A few, though, can’t be trusted to cross the street in a straight line. Follow these 13 steps to separate the pros from the bad eggs, avoid misunderstandings and expensive missteps from the outset and get the most for your money:

1. Get recommendations. The absolute best way to find a reputable and competent contractor is to ask friends, colleagues and family for the names of contractors with whom they’ve had a great experience. Send your network an email: describe your project, perhaps including your price range, and outline what you hope for in a contractor. Or just phone friends or ask people for recommendations as you run into them.

Assemble a list of the most-promising names you’ve received. Chat a bit with those who made the recommendations to find out:

  • Why do you recommend this contractor?
  • How did you meet him or her?
  • What kind of work did you have done (to eliminate high-end specialists, for example, if you are working on a rock-hard budget)?
  • Did the contractor finish on time and on budget?
  • Tell me about any problems you ran into with this contractor.

2. Verify licenses. When you have narrowed your list to two or three contractors, ask to see their business licenses. Make photocopies and verify they are current by contacting the board or agency that licenses contractors in your state.

Resources:

  • Find your state’s licensing agency on its website at USA.gov.
  • The National Association of State Contractors Licensing Agencies lists licensing agencies for most states.

3. Track down complaints and disciplinary actions. When calling your state’s licensing agency, ask how to find complaints and government disciplinary actions against contractors.

“What You Should Know Before You Hire a Contractor,” a consumer publication by the Virginia Board for Contractors, has plenty of information for homeowners everywhere. In some states, you can check a contractor’s status online. Washington state, for example, lets you verify that a contractor’s workers’ compensation insurance is paid up and find out if the contractor is registered, bonded and insured or has state licensing infractions.

4. …read more

Read more here: 13 Steps to Hiring a Contractor Who Won’t Rip You Off

Category: consumer issues, economy, home improvement, housing market, painting, remodeling

9 Things That Can Make Retirement Really Stink

By Money Talks News...

The shimmering dream of retirement beckons to many people as the primary goal of work. Retirement holds the promise, finally, of time to call your own and the chance to pursue what matters most to you if work has kept you from it.

Retirement, though — at least the 20th-century middle-class ideal of it in the United States — is under siege. Here are nine reasons why, for many Americans, retirement may not be what they dreamed.

1. You might have to retire before you’re ready. Forty-nine percent of retirees surveyed in 2012 had to retire sooner than they’d planned, usually because of health problems, according to the Retirement Income Reference Book published by LIMRA, a research firm focused on insurance and financial services.

Other reasons that early retirement is forced on workers include job loss or burnout and negative work conditions, reports Mark Miller, publisher of Retirement Revised.

2. It’s no fun hanging out with your spouse 24/7. Financial planners say many couples have trouble getting used to spending more time together. Writes MainStreet.com:

“Everyone gets excited about retirement — they think they’re going to walk out the door and never look back and spend their days relaxing and traveling with their spouse, but then they get home and they find they can’t actually stand the person they’ve been married to for the last 30 years,” says Deana Arnett, senior planning consultant at Rosenthal Wealth Management Group. “I’ve seen it happen more times than I care to tell you.”

To be sure, many couples love 24/7 togetherness. But not everyone. A financial planner I know sees the toll retirement can take on marriages. He observes that husbands who have been extremely focused on their jobs in particular seem to struggle with the hole it leaves in their lives after they stop working.

Relationships can endure this transition. Finding retirement pursuits that give life meaning — philanthropy or volunteering, and not just a life built around golf and travel — will give both spouses a sense of renewal.

For some ideas, check out 12 Ways to Connect and Contribute in Your Community after Retiring.

3. It’s boring. When you hate your boss and feel overwhelmed by work, it may be hard to imagine, but retirees often long for the camaraderie, structure and sense of purpose work delivers. Not to mention the money.

A funny, engaging blog, Retirement: A Fulltime Job, tracks the evolution of former CPA Sydney Lagier, who retired in 2008 at age 44. After two months of retirement, she sounded a little surprised to find that retirement hadn’t changed her much, inside:

What will you spend your time doing after you retire? Whatever you spent your time doing before you retired, minus the job. While I’m sure my interests will evolve over the years (just as they did while I was working), I now spend my time doing exactly what I did before I retired, only more …read more

Read more here: 9 Things That Can Make Retirement Really Stink

Category: aging, health care, major illness, marriage, pensions, retirement, seniors, social security

12 Effective Weapons for Stopping Robocalls

By Money Talks News.
The mobile life is a good life, for the most part, but along with the fun and convenience is a universally hated byproduct: robocalls — calls and texts sent to your phone without your consent.

They are illegal. The 1991 Telephone Consumer Protection Act and other rules limit telephone soliciting and automatic dialing. But some unwanted calls are legal and others may get past the walls built to protect consumers.

Slippery Devils

It’s hard to stop robocalls completely and forever. Some telemarketers are slippery devils, constantly finding new ways to fly beneath the radar. You can block most, though, using apps, phone features, common sense and by signing up for protection through a federal registry. Here are 12 best ways to protect yourself from robocalls:

1. Don’t pick up. Don’t answer it. Well, duh, you say: Sometimes you can’t tell when a call is from a solicitor. But there are clues. Unfamiliar phone numbers and numbers not recognized by your phone’s contact list, for instance. If you’re unsure about a call, screen it by letting it go to voicemail.

2. Join the ‘National Do Not Call’ registry. Ignoring calls doesn’t always stop them, though. In 2004 the Federal Trade Commission launched a national registry where consumers can sign up to block phone and text solicitors. It is super easy to use. It doesn’t stop all annoying calls and text spam (see below), but it helps.

To sign up, go to Do Not Call and enter your phone number or numbers — cellphones and landlines — and your email address. You’ll get an email immediately with a link to click for activating your request. That’s it.

Telemarketers have 31 days to stop calling a registered phone. But there are some exceptions:

  • Faxes aren’t covered.
  • Only personal phones are covered. Business phones aren’t covered by the registry.
  • Registering won’t stop all solicitations. “Calls from or on behalf of political organizations, charities, and telephone surveyors would still be permitted, as would calls from companies with which you have an existing business relationship, or those to whom you’ve provided express agreement in writing to receive their calls,” the Better Business Bureau says.

3. Ignore bogus calls from ‘the registry.’ The Do Not Call Registry doesn’t make phone calls. Scammers may call, claiming to represent the registry and trying to get you to “sign up.” Don’t do it. Hang up.

4. Complain. If a robocaller persists after the 31-day deadline is up, write down the phone number that appears on your caller ID and use it to file a complaint here, with the FTC. Or call 888-382-1222 (TTY 866-290-4236).

To complain you’ll need the date you received the call and either the company’s name or phone number. The FTC requires telephone solicitors to tell you — if you ask — their name, whom they’re calling on behalf of and their address or phone number. But of course many …read more

Read more here: 12 Effective Weapons for Stopping Robocalls

Category: advertising, cellphone, consumer issues, consumer protection, do not call, ftc, landline, marketing, mobile, robocalls, telecom, telephone

14 Easy Ways to Create an Emergency Food Stockpile

By Money Talks News...
Stockpiling food and water is like buying insurance. Your household may never face a devastating earthquake, a crippling storm, a flu pandemic or other disaster, but if it does, and you are cut off even for a week from food and services, your stored food and water may be priceless to you.

Beyond Paralysis

Many of us are paralyzed by the job of home emergency planning. We have good intentions, but it’s hard to plan for the unknown in any case and even harder to imagine an extraordinary event. If your money is tight, it’s understandably difficult to spend it on food you might not ever need. And where will you find room for all those emergency supplies, anyway?

Fortunately, none of these obstacles is insurmountable. You don’t have to do it all at once. Here are 14 easy ways to jump-start your process and get going:

1. Set a goal. Begin by deciding how much you ultimately want to store. Should you aim for three days’ worth of supplies? Or three weeks? Or three months? Advice varies, depending on the kind of emergency that might strike where you live and how long you anticipate being cut off from supplies.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that a flu pandemic is bound to hit eventually, and so it advises stockpiling a two-week supply of food and water:

Although the flu pandemic may last several months, buy and store at least two weeks’ supply of food, water, medicine and face masks. (Food and supplies may be hard to get during a pandemic.) When you have to stay home, these supplies will support your family and pets.

On the website for Latah County, Idaho, a writer calling herself “Average Concerned Mom” describes her plan for a two-week stockpile (although a six-to-12-week supply is ideal, she says) for households on a limited budget and with limited space.

2. Start small. Make it cheap and easy to get started by setting your initial goal low. Just aim at first for enough food to keep your household going for three days, for instance. When you hit that goal, you can keep going, moving the goalposts to one or two weeks. Keep it up until you’ve reached your ultimate goal, whether it’s two weeks, three months or three years.

3. Stockpile water. The Federal Emergency Management Agency says a normally active person will drink two quarts of water a day. You’ll need more than that, though. The CDC recommends storing one gallon a day for each person and each pet. Set a goal of stockpiling at least a two weeks’ supply of water.

If you have to choose, it’s better to stockpile water than food. Both are necessary, of course. However, humans can make it for three weeks without food but only for three days without water, says LiveScience.

4. Store your water safely. “Unopened commercially bottled water is the safest and most reliable emergency water supply,” says the CDC, which offers these …read more

Read more here: 14 Easy Ways to Create an Emergency Food Stockpile

Category: emergency, family money, financial literacy, food and drink, home and garden, household budget, natural disasters, personal finance

9 Dumb Ways to Borrow Money — and 4 Better Choices

By Money Talks News..

Of all the ways to waste money, giving it to high-interest lenders, pawnbrokers and loan sharks is one of the worst. At least when you gamble, you get some entertainment. With a high-interest loan, you just shovel money — and lots of it — into someone else’s hands.

Some of the worst loans possible:

1. Payday loans. Payday loans have a bad name. Here’s why: The finance charge can run $10 to $30 for every $100 you borrow. That’s an APR of nearly 400 percent. That makes even credit card interest rates — usually between 12 percent and 30 percent — look good.

Payday loans (or “cash advances”) are small, high-interest loans repaid from your paycheck. Typically you borrow $500 or less. You may have to give the lender access to your checking account or write a check for the full loan amount for use in case you miss a payment.

Payday loans typically are due in full from your next paycheck. Some, though — for bigger fees — offer interest-only payments (or “renewals” or “rollovers”) or may be repaid in installments over time. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has a detailed description.

Payday loans can get borrowers into deep trouble. “If you roll over the loan multiple times it’s possible to pay several hundred dollars in fees and still owe the amount you borrowed,” says the CFPB, in a warning about rollovers. Some states ban rollovers.

2. Car title loans. With these short-term, high-cost loans, you hand over the title to your car, truck, motorcycle or other vehicle and pay a fee, sometimes up to 25 percent of the loan (or $25 in fees for every $100 you borrow). For example, if you borrow $1,000 for 30 days at 25 percent, you’d owe $1,250 at the end of the month, or $250 in costs. A 300 percent APR isn’t uncommon for a car-title loan.

You often have 30 days to repay. If not, the lender takes the vehicle. That happens less than you’d think, according to researchers at Vanderbilt University.

But the bigger danger is that you’ll underestimate the real costs. “[R]esearch shows that most title loan customers are overly optimistic that they will pay back their loans on time, which means the loan ends up costing them much more than they believe it will when they first receive it,” the researchers say.

Consumer.gov offers more information on how car-title loans work.

3. ‘Buy Here Pay Here’ Car Dealerships. “Buy here pay here” is used to describe car dealers that charge high-interest loans to borrowers who can’t qualify for regular car loans. “Bad credit? You can still get a car,” an ad might say.

“Many of the lots require customers to return once or twice a month to make loan payments in cash — hence the term Buy Here Pay Here,” writes the Los Angeles Times.

Also, subprime dealers often outfit vehicles with “starter-interrupt” devices that use a GPS locator to track the car and shut off the engine …read more

Read more here: 9 Dumb Ways to Borrow Money — and 4 Better Choices

Category: buying a car, car title loans, cash, cfpb, consumer protection, interest rates, loans, pawn shops, payday loans, personal finance, personal loans, saving money

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